Northern Lights and Swans

DSC_3747.jpg

DSC_3751.jpg

DSC_3753.jpg

Hljómskálagarður

It was strange, at least for me, to leave the road and nature and come back to walk on paved roads and wear what I now referred to as “city shoes.” But Reykjavík is so lovely that, while strange, the change wasn’t too difficult to accept. And it’s not like there aren’t any parks anywhere.

DSC_3763.jpg

DSC_3758.jpg

DSC_3764.jpg

DSC_3762.jpg

DSC_3772.jpg

DSC_3773.jpg

DSC_3869.jpg

DSC_3778.jpg

The National Gallery of Iceland was originally founded in 1884 in Copenhagen by Björn Bjarnarson, based mostly on gifts by Danish artists, and located in the House of Parliament. In 1916, it became a branch of the National Museum of Iceland, and moved in 1950 to share a space with it. It received its full independence in 1961, and in 1987 moved to its current location, a building originally constructed as an icehouse in 1916.

DSC_3779.jpg

While there, we saw the work of Hulda Hákon in her exhibition Who are your people?

DSC_3788.jpg

DSC_3798.jpg

DSC_3809.jpg

DSC_3807.jpg

DSC_3815.jpg

DSC_3827.jpg

DSC_3831.jpg

DSC_3829.jpg

DSC_3867.jpg

DSC_3868.jpg

DSC_3883.jpg

The National Museum of Iceland

The National Museum of Iceland was established in 1863 with objects that had previously been part of Danish collections. It was called the Antiquarian Collection up until 1911, when the name was changed to the National Museum of Iceland.

DSC_3897.jpg

For a while, its collection was housed in attics across Reykjavík — in the Cathedral, House of Corrections, Parliament, and National Bank — and later in the attic of the National Library building, which is now the Culture House and part of the museum. In 1944, Parliament decided to give the museum its own building, into which its collection moved in 1950.

DSC_3907.jpg

DSC_3916.jpg

DSC_3928.jpg

DSC_3930.jpg

Sæmundur í Sparifötunum

After brief stops at Fischer (where we met the cutest dog ever) and the Handknitting Association of Iceland for some souvenir shopping, we grabbed a bite to eat at Sæmundur í Sparifötunum, a restaurant inside Kex Hostel.

DSC_3935.jpg

DSC_3937.jpg

DSC_3936.jpg

DSC_3954.jpg

I could have just moved in, honestly.

DSC_3955.jpg

DSC_3963.jpg

DSC_3983.jpg

This trip was seriously such a dream, and I’m still pinching myself that it happened and that everything went so perfectly. Iceland is not cheap, but the trip is definitely worth the expense — I’m already planning to go back to this magical land of darkless nights, half-trolls, and neverending moss-covered lava fields. And who knows? Maybe next time I’ll just stay forever.

DSC_4008.jpg

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s